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Action Alert

House Expected to Vote Soon on Senate-Passed Health-Reform Bill
Call or Email Your Representative -- AGAIN!

You're Making a Difference FOR Freedom

March 20, 2010

The House Democratic leadership has dropped their plan to wrap the Senate-passed health reform bill (H.R. 3590) into a reconciliation health-reform bill (H.R. 4872 -- which was posted online yesterday), according to BNA's Health Care Policy Report.

The BNA reports "The House Democratic leadership told lawmakers March 20 that they have dropped their plan to wrap passage of a Senate-passed health care bill (H.R. 3590) into the rule allowing floor consideration of a health care reconciliation bill (H.R. 4872), according to Rep. Dennis Cardoza (D-Calif.)."

Bottom Line: The House is expected to vote soon on the already-passed Senate bill (H.R. 3590). The Institute for Health Freedom has previously pointed out that this legislation destroys both freedom and privacy. It does so by:

  • mandating nearly ever citizen to buy “qualified” health insurance;
  • requiring qualified health insurance companies to exchange everyone’s personal health information electronically; and
  • tying the mandatory electronic data exchanges to the HIPAA privacy rule, which actually permits data sharing for many purposes without patients' consent.

Contact Congress and Tell Them to Vote NO on the Senate-Passed Mandatory Health-Insurance Bill (H.R. 3590)

Call Congress AS SOON AS POSSIBLE and tell them to vote NO on the Senate-passed mandatory health insurance bill (H.R. 3590). 

Congress’s main number is (202) 225-3121.  Or email Congress here: https://writerep.house.gov/writerep/welcome.shtml

Following is sample language to use:

Dear Congressman/Congresswoman XX:

I earnestly request that you vote NO on the Senate-passed mandatory health-insurance bill (H.R. 3590) because the bill destroys both freedom and privacy.  It does so by: first, requiring nearly ever citizen to buy “qualified” health insurance; second, requiring qualified health insurance companies to exchange everyone’s personal health information electronically; and third, tying the mandatory electronic data exchanges to the HIPAA privacy rule, which actually permits data sharing for many purposes without patients' consent.